Lend Academy Network Forum

Lending Club Discussion => Investors - LC => Topic started by: hdsouza on January 19, 2018, 09:04:03 AM

Title: Investing with Bondora
Post by: hdsouza on January 19, 2018, 09:04:03 AM
Moderators: I apologize if Iam posting in the incorrect part of the forum, although I did not see a placeholder for Bondara. (Maybe it can be moved to a different part of the forum.. somewhere more relevant)

As the LC market slowly dries up has any one ventured into  https://www.bondora.com (https://www.bondora.com) ?
They appear to be similar to LC in having a primary and secondary market, but its out of the US .

I had opened a new account and had done some leg work but have not invested yet.
Here are some responses I received from Bondora support:
Quote
1) Is my account secured?
1) Please elaborate.

2) Which Country is Bondora based in?
2) Bondora is a leading peer-to-peer platform for investing in unsecured European personal loans, based in Tallinn, Estonia. We are currently issuing loans 3 countries such as Estonia, Finland and Spain, but we have investors from all over the world, mainly from Europe. For more information, please refer to following link - https://support.bondora.com/hc/en-us/articles/214229765-Who-can-invest-on-Bondora-

3) What is the minimum NOTE value?
3) Minimum note is 1€.
This year we updated our bid allocation system. With a new system there is no option to set minimum bid size tries to make a bid, but the system is now way more equal. Please kindly refer to our recent blog article on following link for more information - https://www.bondora.com/blog/new-bid-allocation-model-levels-the-playing-field-for-investors/

4) For the secondary market , can I setup filters based on country, etc?
4) Yes - there are lots of filters available, including country.

5) Can the loan data in the secondary market available for download as an CSV file?
5) Sure, all transaction ledgers and data on issued loans that is not covered by the data protection laws public are available and be downloaded via our public statistics and data export pages. It also includes Secondary Market transactions history.

6) Is API access available? If so where can I see my API key and documentation.
6) Thank you for the interest! Yes, we do have an API available. With the API you can choose the criteria of your preference for your investments. The API is accessible on live site at https://api.bondora.com/ with all its documentation.

7) Are there any Fees? What are DCA fees?
7) There are no fees for investing in the primary or secondary markets. A small collection and recovery fee is deducted from the cash flows of delinquent loans - this is to cover the debt servicing costs.
Title: Re: Investing with Bondora
Post by: jd on January 19, 2018, 10:08:15 AM
Quote
As the LC market slowly dries up

The LC market is drying up?
Title: Re: Investing with Bondora
Post by: hdsouza on January 19, 2018, 02:35:10 PM
The LC market is drying up?
Well the Liquidity is not the same as what it was and add that to the notes cancelled after "Pending settlement" , that leaves us with even fewer purchased notes. But you are right, I should not have used the words "LC market is drying up".
Title: Re: Investing with Bondora
Post by: lendingprosper23 on January 21, 2018, 08:18:11 PM
Quote
As the LC market slowly dries up

The LC market is drying up?

I have been trying to liquidate my portfolio of b and c loans, current, with a 5.5% discount for 10 months.... out of 5000, I still have 400 left.

Id say the market is pretty illiquid.
Title: Re: Investing with Bondora
Post by: jd on January 22, 2018, 08:59:46 AM
Quote
I have been trying to liquidate my portfolio of b and c loans, current, with a 5.5% discount for 10 months.... out of 5000, I still have 400 left.

Id say the market is pretty illiquid.

I misunderstood the original post. I thought comment about drying up was about new loans been issued by Lending Club.
Title: Re: Investing with Bondora
Post by: thezfunk on February 10, 2018, 06:09:07 PM
Seeing as it is based in Estonia, when the borrower default does Igor come to their house and break kneecaps?  Is that an extra fee to the lender?
Title: Re: Investing with Bondora
Post by: bkcarolina on March 10, 2018, 06:18:11 AM
Seeing as it is based in Estonia, when the borrower default does Igor come to their house and break kneecaps?  Is that an extra fee to the lender?

We all know Americans don't get out much (both physically and intellectually), and here we can see an example of why that's really for the best.
Title: Re: Investing with Bondora
Post by: hdsouza on March 16, 2018, 10:20:46 AM
Be careful about investing with Bondora. I had sent 500 euros (in dollars) in Feb. After about 3 days i noticed an additional 500 euros in my account. I though they gave me some kind of bonus but when I checked my credit card, it appears they pulled from my credit card. The was no response from support initially. I reached out to them via facebook and they mentioned it was a known problem and the money would be refunded.

Then they mentioned that I am not an accredited investor, so they cancelled my account. And this was after support kept asking me to fund my account from when it was opened in January.

They finally did refund the money to my credit card, but not the foreign transaction fees.
I sent them another email this morning. Maybe I will have to send them some really nice posts on facebook again.
Beware !!!!
Title: Re: Investing with Bondora
Post by: bkcarolina on March 28, 2018, 01:09:16 PM
I have been putting a little into Bondura since mid 2015 and now have about $6000 there. It's holding steady at 14.4% returns since the beginning until now.

You have to have an EU bank account to invest. Then you will have EU taxes from the country where your bank account is, so for me that means my 14.4% will be taxed at about 40% but that's fine. (Not a problem since those taxes go to healthcare, good transport, safe and clean cities, etc.)

Unlike in the beginning, you can no longer choose your own notes. You give bondora your money and set limits of how much to invest per note (as low as $5 per) and they spread it all out for you with some algorithms they have. So it's really P2P but you give up the control.
Title: Re: Investing with Bondora
Post by: jd on March 28, 2018, 03:14:25 PM
Quote
Quote
We all know Americans don't get out much (both physically and intellectually

Sorry we don't live up to your standards.
Title: Re: Investing with Bondora
Post by: Tauri on April 01, 2018, 05:12:25 PM
Moderators: I apologize if Iam posting in the incorrect part of the forum, although I did not see a placeholder for Bondara. (Maybe it can be moved to a different part of the forum.. somewhere more relevant)

As the LC market slowly dries up has any one ventured into  https://www.bondora.com (https://www.bondora.com) ?
They appear to be similar to LC in having a primary and secondary market, but its out of the US .

I had opened a new account and had done some leg work but have not invested yet.
Here are some responses I received from Bondora support:
Quote
1) Is my account secured?
1) Please elaborate.

2) Which Country is Bondora based in?
2) Bondora is a leading peer-to-peer platform for investing in unsecured European personal loans, based in Tallinn, Estonia. We are currently issuing loans 3 countries such as Estonia, Finland and Spain, but we have investors from all over the world, mainly from Europe. For more information, please refer to following link - https://support.bondora.com/hc/en-us/articles/214229765-Who-can-invest-on-Bondora-

3) What is the minimum NOTE value?
3) Minimum note is 1€.
This year we updated our bid allocation system. With a new system there is no option to set minimum bid size tries to make a bid, but the system is now way more equal. Please kindly refer to our recent blog article on following link for more information - https://www.bondora.com/blog/new-bid-allocation-model-levels-the-playing-field-for-investors/

4) For the secondary market , can I setup filters based on country, etc?
4) Yes - there are lots of filters available, including country.

5) Can the loan data in the secondary market available for download as an CSV file?
5) Sure, all transaction ledgers and data on issued loans that is not covered by the data protection laws public are available and be downloaded via our public statistics and data export pages. It also includes Secondary Market transactions history.

6) Is API access available? If so where can I see my API key and documentation.
6) Thank you for the interest! Yes, we do have an API available. With the API you can choose the criteria of your preference for your investments. The API is accessible on live site at https://api.bondora.com/ with all its documentation.

7) Are there any Fees? What are DCA fees?
7) There are no fees for investing in the primary or secondary markets. A small collection and recovery fee is deducted from the cash flows of delinquent loans - this is to cover the debt servicing costs.
Hey, hdsouza!

I have to add that the fees part is something that is not 100% clear always. They deduct up to 35% from the cashflow recovered and I personally think that this is a lot (up to 35% means that they average it to 35%, for some loans the deduction is bigger and for some smaller). So, "A small collection and recovery fee.." is a bit soft to say.

I started investing in Bondora early 2013 and stopped around late 2015 with one account and tried again with another account on early 2016. At first the returns were 20%+ according to Bondora, now they are rather 9-14%. One of my friend also tried with small amount and the results were ridiculous: 1000 euros invested, net realized gain -18,99 euro, but net profit according to Bondora was around 14%. So, go figure.. I haven't calculated my exact return due to several reasons, main being the dissapointment that came along with Bondora when they constantly changed their, well "things". I think I might broke even after tax. Pre-tax was something like 3600 deposits and 4700 withdrawals. We have to pay 20% tax from all interest and no deduction of bad loans is allowed (I reside in Estonia).

Today Bondora is targeting German market to get more investors. To me it seems that local investors are looking away from Bondora. There are some Latvian platforms that offer BuyBack Guarantee, also invoice financing and real estate development or backed investments. If you are patient and willing to go through the hassle that comes along with Bondora, it might pay off. Otherwise there are alternatives that are more investor friendly.
Title: Re: Investing with Bondora
Post by: Fred93 on May 16, 2018, 07:36:12 AM
There are several threads on Bondora.  This seems to be the most active, so I'll add my thoughts here.  (even tho this thread is in the wrong place)

I recently opened an account with Bondora.  They used to require US folks to have an EU bank account, which is difficult.  That requirement has apparently gone away, so I opened an account.  They do require you to prove that you are an "accredited investor" which is a hassle.  I satisfied that requirement with a letter from my CPA.  Web site asked me to upload a scan of my driver's license.  Ok.  Then they sent email telling me that a Driver's license is no longer acceptable ID.  They required a scan of my passport!  Yipes.

I did the initial wire xfer from my bank.  Not best choice.  Banks give lousy exchange rates on overseas wires.  Next time (if there is a next time) I'll try a stock broker.  Bondora also suggest some money transfer services, but they have even higher fees.  So for a US person, getting money in and out is a bit of a trouble spot.

Once I was online I started learning about Bondora.

First, Bondora is SMALL relative to the P2P guys in the US.  Very very small.  They do about 1500 loans/month.  Average loan size is 1900 Euro.  That's about 3 million Euro/month, or 36 million Euro/year.  I got these numbers from the spreadsheet of all loans which you can download.

Contrast that to LC, which is originating about $7 billion/year.  (Euro and $ are almost same value.)

Bondora's originations are running at 1/200 the rate of Lendingclub!


What LC calls a "listing", Bondora calls an "auction".  The Bondora API allows you to download a list of "auctions".  When I first tried this, I was confused because the list was empty.  The list of auctions is almost always empty!  Auctions apparently start when a borrower finishes his application, and end THIRTY SECONDS LATER!  So most of the time there are 0 auctions open, and once or twice an hour (on the average) an auction appears and is available for thirty seconds, and is then gone. 

To use the API, you have to constantly poll, asking "are there any auctions?".  The good news is that because the list is almost always empty, this polling is very fast and low cost.

Well, that's a little different.  There's no "feeding time" frenzy as there is with LC or Prosper.  LC and P allocate a loan to the first people who bid, and then the loan closes when enough people have bid to fund the loan.  On Bondora, it appears that auctions are open for a minimum time (which I believe is 30 seconds, although their blog says it may soon be shorter) and the loan is "allocated" among the people who bid during the open window.  I can't imagine why they would want to make this interval even shorter.  Seems nuts.  Would simply force people to poll more frequently. 

There are some other interesting differences with their API vs LC and P.  When you bid, the return values don't tell you how much you got or whether you got any at all.  It tells you that your bid was posted.  You have to remember the bid ID, and come back later and ask whether the bid was successful.  They don't tell you how much later you should come back to check this!  I guess I'll have to experiment.  This is apparently a consequence of the open bidding window scheme.  I think its a nice idea, but I haven't figured out how I'm going to handle it in my code yet.  Seems like I'll need to keep a list of my open bids and then come back later and get the status and log that result.   What if I make the query later and the bid is still open?  Then will I have to come back even later and ask again?  Maybe.  There are 7 possible status values for a bid, according to the docs.  Hopefully I will be able to avoid any logic in my code to deal with most of these.  Still, I'll have to handle at least the categories (okbutnotyet, iscompleted, gotsomeerror).  They give no clue how this works, so I'll just experiment, and then guess how to handle it, write code, and then learn why that was the wrong way to do it.

There is an API endpoint where I can ask for my past bids, both open and closed, but I haven't figured it out yet.  So far it always returns an empty list of bids.  I know that the automated investment tool has made many bids for me, so I expected to see a bunch of bids, but they don't show up when I make this query, so I'm thinkin' that those bids go somewhere else! 

Aside: Every web API is different in big ways, and most of the stuff you need to know is NOT in the API documentation.  Somehow there is a modern culture of documenting these APIs by only documenting the interface, ie "this endpoint returns these values".  Yea, but when should I hit that endpoint, and what does it mean?   The modern approach seems to be to write ZERO about how things work, so you have to figure it all out by experimentation and talking with others to learn ancient folklore.   You can't design software until you figure out how stuff works, and you can't figure out the fine points until you've written software and tried to use it all.  Pain in the ass!  I had to figure it all out for LC and Prosper, and separately for LC's secondary market API, and for Funding Circle, and now I'm having to do the same for Bondora.

So far I haven't bid on any auctions.  I've only used their automated investing tool.  It appears to most of the time allocate me a 1 euro slice of a loan.  Wow that's small.  Well the loans are small to begin with, and I'm guessing that there are lots of people who would like a slice.

With only 50 new loans/day average, the pickin' is slim.  Most of the loans of course have parameters that I don't like.  If you start filtering, eliminating the high risk grades, or filtering on other parameters, like filtering out people with no credit experience, the # loans/day that are suitable is very small.  If you can only get a few euro into each of these loans, then maybe you can only invest 5 or 10 euro/day, or something like that.

The Bondora blog says they've recently changed the allocation policy.  They used to allocate bigger slices of loans to bigger investors.  (I'm not sure exactly how this worked, as they don't write down the details of how things work in general.)  Blog says they now allocate same to everyone.  Well I can tell you that most loans I've got thru the automated investing thing on their web site are 1 Euro slices!  Occasionally I get 10 Euro, and even got one 50 Euro slice.  But if I'm gonna get 1 Euro most of the time, and I'm interested in only 5% (say) of their 50 new loans/day, that's 2.5 Euro per day of investment, which isn't going to generate enough interest to pay for the time it took to write this note!

Apparently 1 euro is the minimum slice of a loan you can own, however there is a blog post which appears to say that they're going to make this even smaller.  Yipes!  (This is a small company that keeps changing how things work as they learn and grow.  Its an experiment.)  The API has a parameter where you can specify a minimum investment in a loan, but they've recently obsoleted that parameter.  I wonder could I end up owning e0.01 worth of a loan?  I hope sanity kicks in and they won't allow that.  I could end up with a e100,000 account which contained 10 million loans!  That would make a heck of a monthly statement.  Of course at their present rate of originating 18,000 loans/year, if I bought into 5% of them, that would be 900/year, which would mean I'd need 11 thousand years to buy all those loans.  Hmm.

One thing I didn't like about their automated tool is that the controls are very coarse.   You can specify which grades you will accept, but you can't specify an allocation among them.  So at first I specified AA,A,B,C only to discover that almost all of my money was going into grade C.  Only thing I could do to stop that was to turn off grade C.  That really slowed down my investing!  Apparently the high quality loans are a small fraction of the total.

As I learn more about how the API works (and I don't mean the so-called documentation, I mean how it actually works in practice), I plan to try some API-based bidding, to see if it works differently than the automated investing tool.  For example, I wonder if I can get bigger slices of loans.
Title: Re: Investing with Bondora
Post by: Fred93 on May 16, 2018, 08:52:23 AM
Example ... A pic of my recent investments via Bondora's automated investing tool.  Note almost all are 1 euro per loan.
(https://forum.lendacademy.com/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Ffred93.com%2Ffbi%2FCapture-bondora-investments-2018-05-16.JPG&hash=97665bbd87a9b721a4f93a68de73f701)

Oh, and I got to wondering... Bondora has been around since 2009, almost as long as Prosper and Lendingclub.  So how come they're so small?  I took the big spreadsheet of all loans, and counted by year of origination.  It appears that they didn't grow during the first 4 or so years, but are growing now.  Some years they grow and some they don't.  2015 & 2016 no growth.  2017 big growth.  2018 is running about same rate as 2017, so if that continues this will be a no-growth year.  I suppose its a sign of stability that they've been around this long, but they aren't exactly taking the world by storm.  I don't know what to make of this.
(https://forum.lendacademy.com/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Ffred93.com%2Ffbi%2FBondora-loan-count-2018-05-16.png&hash=f4c8e915a00d6d90b159ac3ab31ab4cd)
Title: Re: Investing with Bondora
Post by: arcee49 on May 16, 2018, 03:00:37 PM
Does it worry you the varying size of loan chunks you get?  In other words, if you get a large chunk of the "bad" loans and all the "good" loans only get 1euro invested...seems you could be heavily weighted to the "bad" with only a few large chunks very quickly.
Title: Re: Investing with Bondora
Post by: Fred93 on May 16, 2018, 08:11:50 PM
Does it worry you the varying size of loan chunks you get?  In other words, if you get a large chunk of the "bad" loans and all the "good" loans only get 1euro invested...seems you could be heavily weighted to the "bad" with only a few large chunks very quickly.

Yea.  I'd prefer a different allocation.  I figure with my own software perhaps I will be able to keep my portfolio from heavily weighting the high-risk end. 

On the other hand, this situation may simply reflect the supply and demand.  In other words, if there are lots of high risk loans and many fewer low risk loans, then it may be that the amount of money I can invest in the low risk loans is just severely limited no matter what I do.

I can look at the published data on all existing loans to see the distribution of supply among grades, but they only way I can learn about demand is to participate in the market, so I'm doing that and learning. 

I'm also worried that maybe the Bondora market is just too small to let one make choices. 
Title: Re: Investing with Bondora
Post by: wiseclerk_com on May 19, 2018, 06:52:13 PM
Fred93 thx for doing the detailed analysis and sharing your steps and thoughts.

One point regarding
Quote
First, Bondora is SMALL relative to the P2P guys in the US.  Very very small.  They do about 1500 loans/month.  Average loan size is 1900 Euro.  That's about 3 million Euro/month, or 36 million Euro/year.  I got these numbers from the spreadsheet of all loans which you can download.

Contrast that to LC, which is originating about $7 billion/year.  (Euro and $ are almost same value.)

Bondora's originations are running at 1/200 the rate of Lendingclub!

The loans you are targeting (grades AA, A, B) are nearly all Estonian loans, with an occasional high graded Finnish loan in between.
Estonia has about 1M inhabitants therefore the market size for this nation is roughly 1/300 of the US market (325M inhabitants).

Bondora is constantly changing. It is a very different market now compared to when I started lending there in 2012. Thereby the strategies of investors have changed considerably too.
There are >15000 posts of Bondora investors discussing things here:
http://www.p2p-kredite.com/diskussion/bondora-isepankur-f17.html
(you will have to use Chrome with translate or Google translate).
Several of the very active investors that wrote scripts to use the API have switched from investing on the primary market and now concentrate mostly on buying and trading on the secondary market.
One very active investor, Oktaeder, who also programmed his own script recently summed up his 5 years investor experience on Bondora here:
http://p2p4oktaeder.blogspot.de/2017/12/funf-jahre-bondora.html 
At the point of writing he had 5000 loan parts in his portfolio.

My portfolio consists only of about 600 loan parts. But most of those are from the time when it was possible to make larger bids. I wrote my 5 years summary (in English) here:
https://www.p2p-banking.com/countries/baltic-my-p2p-lending-investment-portfolio-at-bondora-is-now-5-years-old/
But I haven't used the API for investing.
Title: Re: Investing with Bondora
Post by: Fred93 on May 19, 2018, 07:33:41 PM
Thanks for those links, and the hint re using chrome.  Seems to be a healthy discussion going on among investors.

Re countries, I didn't restrict Bondora on countries, only grade.  It appears that there are no AA,A,B loans to borrowers in Spain, in other words Bondora's grading system believes all borrowers in Spain are risky.  Not sure what to make of that at this point.  Perhaps I'll have an opinion on this after I learn more.

Seems inconsistent with the press ... such as this... 4/22/2018
https://www.ft.com/content/19df28e6-43a7-11e8-93cf-67ac3a6482fd
Quote
... Spanish economy is on a roll. It has grown at above 3 per cent for the past three years, well above the eurozone average. The International Monetary Fund has raised 2018 growth forecasts from 2.4 per cent to 2.8 per cent, outstripping France, Germany and Italy.

Over the past few months, rating agencies Moody’s, Standard and Poor’s and Fitch have all upgraded Spain’s sovereign debt ratings. Spanish sovereign borrowing costs have fallen sharply over the past six months and unemployment is down from 26 per cent in 2013 to 16 per cent today. “We are going through the greatest economic period in Spanish history,” says Alberto Nadal, the secretary of state for budgets for the ruling centre-right Popular party government.
Title: Re: Investing with Bondora
Post by: wiseclerk_com on May 20, 2018, 05:05:00 AM
Spanish loans are risky (at least my opinion). The real point there is not to compare default rates of say Estonian vs. Spanish loan but whether you trust debt recovery procedures. The Spanish court system is totally different
For Estonian loans Bondora has shown that the procedures are working very good (better than in my home country Germany). And while it might take years, the bailiff eventually steadily recovers the outstanding debt, sometimes even with interest. For the Spanish market it will take further time to discover if Bondora can be equally successful in debt recovery.

In my portfolio there are predominantly Estonian loans and some Finnish loans.
Title: New software for investing with Bondora
Post by: smartfond on October 29, 2018, 03:41:24 AM
Welcome to https://bondorabot.com 
The new app was created to present the software we developed for Bondora.com clients.
This app can potentially boost the performance of your portfolio on Bondora.com and is a natural alternative for using Bondora Portfolio Manager or Bondora Portfolio Pro.
Key benefits (features) of the software:
•   Neural network used to predict loan defaults with 80%+ accuracy of default predictions
•   Variable settings for key loan parameters (vintage, interest, price / XIRR, status)
•   The main purpose of the application is to maximize portfolio returns (meaning XIRR) by choosing the most profitable offers on loans on Bondora Secondary Market avoiding loans with high probability of default
If you are already a Bondora.com client, you can start using BondoraBot app to buy loans on Bondora's Secondary Market via Bondora API and get information on your portfolio within few minutes. And if not - you can follow https://bondora.com/ref/maximv3 to get onboard.

BondoraBot.com is a web application provided FREE OF CHARGE to anyone.

App for P2P Lending Investors
Bondora P2P 24x7 Any Place Any Device
[/i]
BondoraBot is a web-app to make investments with Bondora - famous and most technologically advanced European peer-to-peer lending platform
Multiple Portfolios
Sub-portfolios on a single Bondora Account
BondoraBot allows user to form as many portfolios with different strategies as needed
Speed & Reliability
Vapor 3 - Server Side Swift Development Framework
BondoraBot was developed using Vapor 3 Framework - one of the most used and efficient web frameworks for Swift

How Does the App Work?
First
BondoraBot gets auctions available on Bondora Secondary Market according to user preferences
Then
BondoraBot Neural Network checks if the loans are destined to default, and if not, it buys the most profitable loans
Finally
BondoraBot traces user's portfolios features and performance, updates investments, cashflows and forecasts from Bondora.com

Experience
From April 2017 I own a small investment company in Estonia, which is generally involved in 2 types of activities:
1.   Investing in personal loans via Bondora.com
2.   Investing in start-ups via Funderbeam.com
My investment target is income of not less than 15 % p.a.
While investing on Bondora I noticed that the return tends to be rather random (link). Though in many cases it will probably lean towards medium return (10-20% p.a.) a significant probability is seen that the actual return may be below zero (7 % probability) or below 10 % p.a. (22,5 % probability). Thus I consider it very possible that the actual return may be below the target.
At the same time the best return that one can probably get from investments on Bondora is above 25 % p.a. which seems like absolutely fantastic figure for EUR nominated investments with average risk and high diversification.
The way from having 30 % probability of poor return and rather small chances to win a prize - > to having a vanishing probability of return below average along with rather high probability of becoming best-in-class with 25+ p.a. on the pocket is Proactively managed risk-return strategy. Thus we need to:
•   Analyze each and every loanpart that we purchase on Bondora before actually buing it
•   Buy only loanparts that will not probably be in default
•   Buy only loanparts with the highest possible return
Being able to analyze 65 000 + loans with 100+ parameters each and choose from 250 000 + secondary loanparts offers at Bondora's secondary market is quite a tricky task.
This is what we can call Big Data task, that requires using Artificial Intelligence technics and Neural Network analysis along with the most profound knowledge in both credit risk analysis in consumer segment and financial statistics. To get an opinion of how actually this task may be solved I recommend to pass through following article.
Pricing P2P loans with Machine Learning for fun & profit Published on Published on July 1, 2016 by Eduardo Pena Vina (https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/pricing-p2p-loans-machine-learning-fun-profit-eduardo-pena-vina)
Today the basic tasks described above are completely solved with our new software BondoraBot.com. Here I only finish with the following:

When this site was launched, I used the software to operate a portfolio of 3’000 EUR with 1’500 loanparts bought on Secondary market beginning on May 31th. The actual IRR on existing portfolio in 150 days after BondoraBot.com launch was 25.74 % p.a.   

Disclaimer
We do not carry any obligations on support, renewals, efficiency, performance and even functioning of software, considering that it is provided for free and as-is. We do not collect any personal data. We do not track or trace users operations on Bondora.com. Our soft contains NO viruses, bugs, worms, hidden payments, advertisement, marketing promotions or other features that you may came across similar products distributed on the Net for free. Nor it does install any additional soft, plugings, media files, platforms or drivers.

BondoraBot is made without any support from or affiliation with Bondora AS (www.bondora.com)

This software is provided ‘as-is’, without any express or implied warranty

Permission is granted to anyone to use this software for any purpose, including commercial applications. In no event will the authors be held liable for any damages or investment loss arising from the use of this software.

Contributions
Vapor
Vapor 3 - A server-side Swift web framework
Neural-Network-Playground
hetelek/Neural-Network-Playground
CryptoSwift
krzyzanowskim/CryptoSwift