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FolioFN not actually listing their notes for sale even though they are in your open sell orders

Same here.  I contacted LC about it and they just pointed me back to the documentation....

Unfortunate.  LC customer service ain't what it used to be.  If you have the gumption, press the point.  Gotta get thru the first layer, only-slightly-trained people.

And they wonder why everyone's leaving?  >:(
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I would so not be surprised that I can't wait for Monday to see if my final 4 notes make it through "execution of sale order" on Monday!  This issue of being the only secondary market left is what made me escalate liquidation!
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And why exactly does LC have any incentive to spend money fixing / improving this?
If there is a LC todo list this has to be at the bottom. Take what you have because it ain't gonna get better.
Who would be surprised for LC to pull a Prosper and ditch Folio completely? Anybody?
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FolioFN not actually listing their notes for sale even though they are in your open sell orders

Same here.  I contacted LC about it and they just pointed me back to the documentation....

Unfortunate.  LC customer service ain't what it used to be.  If you have the gumption, press the point.  Gotta get thru the first layer, only-slightly-trained people.
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Yes, it is an annoying problem. For me, it only happens when I buy a note on folio and try to resell it quickly before the next payment due date. For some reason, after the next payment due date, the note will appear in the listings like magic.

Are your notes you are trying to sell bought from folio?

Dark Vulture

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Foliofn - LC / Re: Folio API note selling
« Last post by kuhnrl30 on May 24, 2018, 03:36:40 PM »
I haven't tried it yet but I wouldn't be surprised if there were bugs.  There's issues in the Orders Listing too. 
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FolioFN not actually listing their notes for sale even though they are in your open sell orders

Same here.  I contacted LC about it and they just pointed me back to the documentation....
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Investors - LC / Re: Investing with Bondora
« Last post by wiseclerk_com on May 20, 2018, 05:05:00 AM »
Spanish loans are risky (at least my opinion). The real point there is not to compare default rates of say Estonian vs. Spanish loan but whether you trust debt recovery procedures. The Spanish court system is totally different
For Estonian loans Bondora has shown that the procedures are working very good (better than in my home country Germany). And while it might take years, the bailiff eventually steadily recovers the outstanding debt, sometimes even with interest. For the Spanish market it will take further time to discover if Bondora can be equally successful in debt recovery.

In my portfolio there are predominantly Estonian loans and some Finnish loans.
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Investors - LC / Re: Now, feel a little less bad about paltry returns
« Last post by Rob L on May 19, 2018, 08:41:36 PM »
At this time I don't think the Fed Funds Rate matters much re banks cost of funds.  They're mostly paying essentially zero on checking accounts.  (Once upon a time, people all had savings accounts and checking accounts, and the savings accounts earned interest and the checking accounts didn't.  That line blurred and was essentially erased, so now checking account interest rates are what matters.  After that, rates fell, and people's expectations of receiving interest just evaporated.)

Sure there are a few banks paying significant rates, ala 2% for some savings accounts now.  Those banks are using the high interest rate as advertising.  In other words, instead of paying an ad agency to run a lot of ads on TV and whatnot, they just post a high interest rate, and let a zillion bloggers and bank industry hangers-on (bankrate.com) do the advertising for them.

Rates have been low so long that the public at large has forgotten all about interest on bank accounts.  These few little banks advertising high rate accounts are not yet causing significant money to flow out of accounts at traditional banks.  Until they do, banks have no reason to significantly raise rates. 

I think that it will take SEVERAL YEARS before banks are paying reasonable rates on checking accounts.  They're all gonna play chicken and raise rates very slowly, watching the rate of customer complaints and/or withdrawals.  This should allow banks to be very profitable for the next few years.  That's why I've bought bank stocks.

I have no disagreement with what you've posted. I'd like to take it a bit further. It's not only checking accounts, it's any form of bank interest bearing accounts that have dropped off the public radar. And it wasn't without very very good reason. The Federal Reserve decided to save the world with its zero interest rate policy (ZIRP). Maybe they did. Maybe the vote is still out. Helicopter Ben would have made good on his promise (and actually he did). We live in interesting times. All bank interest rates have been and are still are so low relative to "normalcy" expectations of the adult population they hardly seem worth the bother. Really; that's the point! Until relatively recently this has been true. At least that was my personal perspective and the reason for my experimentation with investments like P2P lending (as it was known back in the day). Now it's "exciting" to see a savings account at 2%. I opened my first "pass book" savings account as a teenager at 4% (guess I was definitely smarter back then) so I'm not "excited". That 2% is more like taking the crumbs that are thrown at my feet. I'm taking them. At 0.06% I wasn't. I have no idea what is normal; maybe there isn't one. The soothsayers seem to be saying that by raising interest rates the Fed will have a tool to use when the next bump in the road comes along. Gee, I hope so.
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Investors - LC / Re: Investing with Bondora
« Last post by Fred93 on May 19, 2018, 07:33:41 PM »
Thanks for those links, and the hint re using chrome.  Seems to be a healthy discussion going on among investors.

Re countries, I didn't restrict Bondora on countries, only grade.  It appears that there are no AA,A,B loans to borrowers in Spain, in other words Bondora's grading system believes all borrowers in Spain are risky.  Not sure what to make of that at this point.  Perhaps I'll have an opinion on this after I learn more.

Seems inconsistent with the press ... such as this... 4/22/2018
https://www.ft.com/content/19df28e6-43a7-11e8-93cf-67ac3a6482fd
Quote
... Spanish economy is on a roll. It has grown at above 3 per cent for the past three years, well above the eurozone average. The International Monetary Fund has raised 2018 growth forecasts from 2.4 per cent to 2.8 per cent, outstripping France, Germany and Italy.

Over the past few months, rating agencies Moody’s, Standard and Poor’s and Fitch have all upgraded Spain’s sovereign debt ratings. Spanish sovereign borrowing costs have fallen sharply over the past six months and unemployment is down from 26 per cent in 2013 to 16 per cent today. “We are going through the greatest economic period in Spanish history,” says Alberto Nadal, the secretary of state for budgets for the ruling centre-right Popular party government.
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