Author Topic: LC declining stock price: a signal?  (Read 14906 times)

Rob L

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Re: LC declining stock price: a signal?
« Reply #30 on: February 05, 2016, 06:55:13 PM »
Only if investors stop funding loans will LC stop making money.

Yep; and if they (we) don't make money they (we) will.
This scenario seems to be personally coming true, and maybe I'm not the only one.

Riker

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Re: LC declining stock price: a signal?
« Reply #31 on: February 14, 2016, 02:27:55 PM »
Got to say I was happy with the earnings report, adjusted earnings came in at 0.05, the high end of my estimate.  The big purchase of put options for Feb lost, not going to look at that volume any more.

Only thing I didn't like was the 150m buy back.  Yea its usually good for a stock but they just did an IPO, they should hold on to the cash.

Stock didn't do much, but I have no problem holding it for a year or so, should slowly climb over time.
"Don't believe everything you read on the internet" - George Washington

AnilG

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Re: LC declining stock price: a signal?
« Reply #32 on: February 15, 2016, 12:10:11 AM »
The buyback is a preemptive attempt to stop stock price from sliding below certain point. Most institutional investment funds have restrictions on holding stock typically below $5, $3, or $1.

Only thing I didn't like was the 150m buy back.  Yea its usually good for a stock but they just did an IPO, they should hold on to the cash.

Stock didn't do much, but I have no problem holding it for a year or so, should slowly climb over time.
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hfguy

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Re: LC declining stock price: a signal?
« Reply #33 on: February 15, 2016, 04:12:19 PM »
The buyback is a preemptive attempt to stop stock price from sliding below certain point. Most institutional investment funds have restrictions on holding stock typically below $5, $3, or $1.


Sounds like a prediction...